Archive for February 25th, 2012

February 25, 2012

Transitions in Hawaii Review

Change, lives in flux – transitions make up the 75th issue of Hawai‘i Review. “[The works feature] just moving from one space to the next,” said Editor in Chief Rachel Wolf, describing the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s biannual literary journal.

Although Wolf didn’t begin by narrowing down submissions with a theme, the common thread emerged on its own. “I found as we were starting to accept things they were all starting to gel around the common theme of change. So we went with that.”

But more than words go into creating an issue of the journal. Visual editor Scot Lycan scoured art shows both on and off campus before he found Peter Chamberlain’s abstract artwork to use as front-cover art. “The image is striking and very bold, and we really felt it spoke to us all,” said Wolf. “His [Chamberlain’s] vision seemed to match very well with what we were going for.” Although the journal is managed by students, Hawai‘i Review accepts non-UH submissions as well. Well-known writers, such as Margaret Atwood, have been published in the past. Wolf admits that finding a completely student-run journal that also publishes from outside sources is a rarity. “We publish the best of the best, but we do try to do a good balance of students and outside submissions,” she said.

Fiction and poetry have been the primary genres of past submissions, but all types of submissions – interviews or nonfiction, for example – are encouraged. Writers send in about 50 or so submissions per month, and on average 15 to 30 authors have their works published in each issue.

Within the next two weeks, the winners of Hawai‘i Review’s Ian MacMillan contest will be announced. According to Wolf, the award is a major draw for submissions and attracts a large audience. Named after an award-winning short-story writer and professor at UH Mānoa, the MacMillan award honors outstanding literary pieces in two categories: poetry and fiction. The winners will be featured in the 76th issue, which is scheduled for release in early May.

“Passion is key,” said Wolf. “Especially as a journal being brought out in Hawai‘i, the spirit of aloha is one of the defining features of any Hawaiian publication … the story has to have a heart.”

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February 25, 2012

Taro Saturdays

First Saturdays at Ka Papa Lo‘i O Kānewai are beginning again this year, starting at 8:15 a.m. on Feb. 4.

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa students and volunteers from the surrounding community come to devote their time to caring for the lo‘i, or taro patch, at the Hawai‘inuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge.

Volunteers learn to perform traditional farming practices to nurture the kalo (taro) and native plants that surround the area while spending time with family and friends.

“One thing that we do here that’s a little different from other places is we make mounds to plant the taro in,” said Hiapo Cashman, the director of the lo‘i. He added that this is a traditional practice done with sugarcane and ‘awa (also known as the kava plant).

Conversing in Hawaiian also gives participants the opportunity to brush up on their Hawaiian language skills.

“Students know they can count on it for class,” said Cashman, noting that many students fulfill their community service hour requirements for scholarships through First Saturdays.

The “Hawaiian Renaissance,” a movement to revive and preserve traditional Hawaiian culture, influenced the restoration of the lo‘i in Kānewai, according to the UH Mānoa Catalog. In 1980, UH Mānoa students found the irrigation ditch that is now the lo‘i and took an interest in restoring the area. Kūpuna, or elders, taught UH Mānoa students the traditional farming practices used to sustain the kalo in the lo‘i today.

Working at the lo‘i is definitely a hands-on experience. Volunteers should not be afraid to get a little muddy.

Courtesy of Hiapo Cashman

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February 25, 2012

From island to mainland (Part 3)

I traveled to D.C. this semester to fulfill an internship position at the Jazz Appreciation Month initiatives at the National Museum of American History. The short three-month period I had in Washington, D.C. seemed to fly by. As the date of my flight back to the Hawaiian islands draws closer, I find myself daydreaming and reflecting back on several of my experiences in D.C. and contrasting them to my previous experiences on Oahu and the Big Island.

One major difference in D.C. is that public events take place all the time. I’ve attended a few great ones; the events that really stick out in my mind are the National Book Festival, National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony, and Taste of D.C. The greatest part of these events is that I didn’t have to spend a dime.

The National Book Festival was a fun way to spend a day, with author readings, book signings and various activities to promote reading in the community. The two-day event held on the National Mall drew more than 200,000 people, according to Library of Congress news.

This is actually the Christmas Tree at the National Harbor in Maryland. It was windy, cold and miserable, but one of the UH Alumni treated me to lunch at McCormick & Shmick's Seafood Restaurant. Yum!

The National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony was a more exclusive event. Patrons of this festival had to enter a lottery weeks in advance. And, even if you signed up, an element of luck has to be on your side to be randomly chosen to receive tickets. After receiving the tickets, doors open one and a half hours prior to the start of the ceremony, so attendants had to be prepared to endure 40-some-odd degree weather. My advice if you attend this winter-time festival: Be sure to bundle up!

Enduring the weather was worth it, though, as I finally saw Barack Obama in person. I was determined to see him; dang it, I had better see him, I’ve spent this entire semester in D.C., after all! Other performers included Marsha Ambrosius, OneRepublic, and Kermit: there was a performer for every age group.

Another really memorable festival I attended when it was warmer out, over Columbus Day weekend in October, was Taste of D.C. More than 60 restaurants lined up along Pennsylvania Avenue, close to the National Mall, to satisfy hungry festival-goers. Appetizers, entrees and desserts were passed out in exchange for tickets, which could be bought in packets of 10 for $15. A special discount of $5 was given to those who purchased 20 tickets online prior to the event. With such large number of participating restaurants, it was tough to make a decision on where to spend my precious tickets. Chili, falafels, samosas, curry, fried Oreos, waffles… The choices were seemingly endless. I walked around for an hour pondering the choices before I finally settled on a few plates that caught my eye!

As my time in D.C. inches closer to the finishing point, I can say one thing for sure about this busy little city: free activities are always in abundance for the adventurous, energetic city folk.

Like this article? It’s the last installment of a 3 part series. To view the previous articles, log onto harleydiven.wordpress.com.

The Office of Community and Alumni Relations at Hawai’i Hall 311 is currently accepting applications for 2012 internships in Washington, D.C. The deadline for applications is March 9, 2012. For more information and application packet materials, visit http://www.artsci.hawaii.edu/alumni/students/scholarships_internships.htm.

February 25, 2012

From island to mainland (Part 2)

This semester, I have been off the University of Hawai‘iat Mānoa campus fulfilling an internship at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. I was matched up with the Jazz Appreciation Month initiatives in the National Museum of American History.

While I didn’t know much about jazz music, my supervisor reassured me that I would be a useful set of new eyes (or rather, ears) in the JAM offices.

I had a few main tasks to complete during my time at JAM. I conducted interviews with a museum curator, teachers and librarians to gather information about jazz legends and JAM public events. I also scoured the Internet for little-known facts about jazz musicians, which I used to write articles based on the information I compiled. Eventually, what I wrote will be posted on the Smithsonian Jazz website (smithsonianjazz.org).

Every Friday, I aided a high school intern in creating a short film using the film editing software Final Cut Pro – which proved to be a tedious program. Scenes had to be cut just right, down to the millisecond, to create fluidity in both the visual and audio components of the video.

Unfortunately, at times I encountered too many lulls in my internship duties and sometimes found myself trying to figure out ways to make the clock tick faster.

In light of this, what really captured my interest during my internship at the National Museum of American History was the fact that it was the National Museum of American History. Not the city museum, not the state museum, but the national museum.

A diverse, multicultural crowd gathered every day at the museum to fulfill their internships; I met college students and graduates from various places in and outside of the United States. The museum provided a welcoming social environment while acting as a magnet, attracting curious museum-goers and knowledge-hungry interns from across the globe.

The interns ate lunch together, and we got to learn what each person was up to. Everyone worked in a different part of the museum, so we all had different tasks. Some worked directly with museum artifacts or filed information about each artifact into an electronic database. Other departments got to speak with museum visitors directly and address concerns and questions.

I was really surprised to find out such a large array of jobs were available in the museum. Prior to this internship, I thought the only staff that could possibly be in a museum were curators, administrative assistants and, perhaps, assistant curators. But there was a place in the museum for anyone, regardless of their field.

Connecting with the interns was a wonderful way for me to expand my network. Most of the interns were originally from cities other than D.C., so I think everyone tried their best to make sure the museum was a place for interns to feel comfortable and fit right in.


The Office of Community and Alumni Relations at Hawai’i Hall 311 is currently accepting applications for 2012 internships in Washington, D.C. The deadline for applications is March 9, 2012. For more information and application packet materials, visit www.artsci.hawaii.edu/alumni/students/scholarships_internships.htm.

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